Blog - Superior Physical Therapy

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October 1, 2021

As a Doctor of Physical Therapy at Superior Physical Therapy in Traverse City, MI, I want to describe what I consider to be the top 3 exercises, or movements, for stenosis pain relief. I will discuss this in the next 3 posts, but first I want to talk about what stenosis is and how you can test yourself for it. You can watch a video demonstration of the 3 movements for stenosis pain relief by clicking on this link: https://youtu.be/1-wH100BVRI It’s one of our most popular videos. Stenosis is a narrowing of the spaces within your spine, which can put pressure on the nerves that travel through the spine. The spaces are dynamic and can close with motion. They can also open up with motion. Some of the motions that can compress the spaces, or make the spaces smaller, if you will, would be: leaning (extension) backwards; Leaning to the right is going to close the space on the SAME (right) side; Rotation to the left is going to compress that space on the OPPOSITE (right) side. Here’s a quick self-test for stenosis. If you have these 3 things, you’re more than 97% likely to have stenosis in your lower

Continue Reading TOP 3 MOVES TO RELIEVE STENOSIS, part 1

DISCLAIMER: THIS WEBSITE DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Superior Physical Therapy does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions or other information that may be mentioned on this website. Reliance on any information appearing on this website is solely at your own risk.

September 17, 2021

Today we are going to shed some light on where your hip pain is coming from, show you a very quick 30 second self-test so you can check your hip function, and go over some of the common causes of hip pain. You might be surprised to know that a good physical therapy program can fix most hip pain issues. Bursitis The first most common issue that we see with patients is called hip bursitis. Typically pain is located on a lateral aspect (or outside) of the hip. It’s painful to the touch or when you lay on that side. In the image, blue circles identify the bursae. Bursae are fluid-filled sacs. When they become inflamed and irritated, they can cause pain. The most common bursa to become inflamed is the lateral trochanteric bursitis, but the others can be effected, including the sacroiliac joint (SI joint). SI joint bursitis is a hip condition, but often it can be confused with lower back pain. Self-Test WATCH THE VIDEO There are simple movement tests we can do to determine the cause of hip pain: With your left foot planted, take a big step forward with the right leg, then step back. Perform

Continue Reading How to Test the Cause of Your Hip Pain

DISCLAIMER: THIS WEBSITE DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Superior Physical Therapy does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions or other information that may be mentioned on this website. Reliance on any information appearing on this website is solely at your own risk.

August 27, 2021

by Dr. Andrew Gorecki, DPT, Owner of Superior Physical Therapy If you’re out there struggling with knee pain, and you’re looking for a natural solution, and you want to avoid injections medications and surgery this article from the Pain-free Living Series will help you. I’ve spent 16 years of my life studying how the body moves, including the bones, joints, nerves, muscles, and bio-mechanics. So I want to simplify all that for you and describe what the knee is designed to do. All joints in the body are where two bones come together to create a space. That space is designed for movement. Different joints like to do certain movements, and they don’t like to do other movements. The first movement the knee is designed to do is to bend and extend – about 140 degrees of bending and extending. It’s very comfortable with those movements. The second movement the knee can do is move side to side. The knee can move side to side about 15 to 20 degrees depending on an individual’s body type. That’s much less movement than bending and extending. 140 degrees versus 15 to 20 degrees. So the knee doesn’t like to move side to

Continue Reading Knee Pain Causes and Quick Relief Exercises

DISCLAIMER: THIS WEBSITE DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Superior Physical Therapy does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions or other information that may be mentioned on this website. Reliance on any information appearing on this website is solely at your own risk.

July 8, 2021

Today we’re talking about the most common type of low back pain called stenosis. Stenosis is also known by other names, most commonly arthritis, and the big scary one – degenerative disc disease. Between each segment of the spine there’s a space where the nerve comes out. That space starts to get narrow as we age. That narrowing is called stenosis. I have a really easy test that will help you understand whether or not your back pain is related to stenosis. The test is actually four questions. If you answer “yes” to all four questions, there’s a ninety-seven percent chance that you actually have stenosis. The questions: are you over the age of 50? do you have pain in your back when you’re standing? do you have pain in your back when you’re walking? does that pain go away when you sit down? Symptoms in addition to pain in your lower back could indicate you have sciatica stenosis. These are: pain that travels down our leg; numbness and tingling in one or both legs; weakness or heaviness in one or both legs. Let’s talk about the common cause of stenosis. Those openings in your spine, let’s call them “spaces”

Continue Reading Stenosis and Sciatica, plus Quick Exercises to Relieve Your Back Pain

DISCLAIMER: THIS WEBSITE DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Superior Physical Therapy does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions or other information that may be mentioned on this website. Reliance on any information appearing on this website is solely at your own risk.

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